An early Christmas gift

What do gays fear in Uganda?

Homosexual acts are already illegal in the most of countries in Africa. Authorities will not hesitate to send gays to jail in Tunisia or Zambia, in some countries (e.g. Sudan) the death penalty can be applied. What is going on in Uganda?

Ugandan Kill-the-Gays Bill

The new anti-gay bill, which you can download here, was introduced in October 2009 by Ugandan politician David Bahati. Originally, it called for the death of all homosexuals (therefore often called ‘Kill the Gays Bill’), but after months of negotiating  with the United Nations, its impacts should not be so drastic anymore. Reintroduced in February 2012, it should still impose some new practices that should not be seen in the modern, civilized world.

According to Examiner, this bill will basically divide gays and lesbians into two groups. ‘Aggravated homosexuality’ deals with gay acts committed by authority figures, parents, pedophiles, or people that are HIV positive. These individuals could face the death penalty if they’re found guilty. On the other end of spectrum is ‘offense of homosexuality,’ a charge that will be applied to adults in the same-sex relationship. If convicted, these people will be prosecuted by life imprisonment.

Reactions

Western leaders strongly criticize the bill. The US president Barack Obama described it as ‘odious’. The international companies have threatened to cut off aid to Uganda, if the country doesn’t protect the rights of gay people properly. Despite the threats, the Ugandan politicians still hope to pass the law, the gantdaily.com informs.

‘Ugandans want that law as a Christmas gift.’

On Monday, November 12, Rebecca Kadaga, the speaker of the Ugandan parliament has announced that she intends to push through the infamous bill before the end of the year. ‘Ugandans want that law as a Christmas gift. They have asked for it and we’ll give them that gift,’ Ms Kadaga says.

The law experts have questioned the bill’s legacy and decided to challenge its constitutionality at the court, the advocate.com reports.

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